How To Tell if Someone Is on Xanax

Alprazolam, also known as Xanax, is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States. Unfortunately, it is highly addictive, and even those who have a medical prescription are susceptible to abusing it.

As with any addiction, Xanax abuse can damage relationships and negatively affect a person's physical and mental health. Recognizing the signs to look out for to tell if someone is on Xanax will make it easier to know if a loved one is struggling with drug abuse.

Drug addiction is frightening, but it can be overcome with the right care and support.

What Is Xanax?

Belonging to a group of drugs known as benzodiazepines, Xanax is the brand name for alprazolam, a commonly prescribed medication used to treat anxiety disorders, panic attacks, and insomnia.

Xanax decreases activity in the brain and body, producing a feeling of relaxation due to being a central nervous system depressant that increases the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is a chemical messenger that stops brain signals that usually result in panic and anxiety.

Along with clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan), Xanax is listed among the 200 most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States.

Though Xanax is legal when prescribed, it is illegal without a prescription due to its adverse side effects and capacity for being misused. Taking too much Xanax can be habit-forming and result in addiction.

What Is Xanax Abuse?

Unfortunately, Xanax is extremely addictive, and physical dependence can develop if it is taken for a prolonged period. The most commonly prescribed benzodiazepine, Xanax is the second most common prescription medication to be involved in emergency room visits due to drug abuse.

Xanax abuse arises when someone takes it against the advice of a medical professional. It can also occur if someone takes the drug when it is not prescribed. This could include taking it recreationally at a party, for example, or another event. Chronic use of Xanax and taking it in high doses can lead to Xanax addiction. Addiction differs from Xanax abuse as those suffering from addiction may find they have lost control over their drug use and may struggle to cope with sober life.

Among those who are medically prescribed Xanax, there are some signs of addiction to look out for. These include:

How To Notice Signs of Xanax Abuse

If you suspect a loved one may have taken Xanax and you are worried about them, you can look for some behaviors and physical signs, such as:

Some other common signs to watch out for include:

Being clear of the warning signs of drug use helps keep people safe and prevents addiction from escalating.

Xanax and Other Drugs

Combining Xanax with other drugs is extremely dangerous. Most fatalities involving Xanax are due to polydrug abuse, which is mixing multiple drugs.

Taking Xanax with other drugs will exacerbate its effects and can result in death. Abusing Xanax while drinking alcohol, for example, can be life-threatening as the potency of both drugs will increase, and both are central nervous system depressants. Even taking Xanax and alcohol in small amounts is highly dangerous.

Using other drugs alongside Xanax can also result in long-term health effects such as depression, memory problems, insomnia, irritability, and addiction.

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms From Xanax Addiction?

Those who use Xanax in higher doses than recommended for a long time will likely experience withdrawal symptoms when they begin treatment.

While it may seem like a good idea, quitting Xanax cold turkey can be extremely dangerous. For this reason, it is important for anyone who has become addicted to Xanax to go through the withdrawal process under the guidance of a licensed medical professional. This can be done at a drug rehab center under the supervision of a specialist and other health professionals.

Xanax withdrawal usually involves tapering the dosage slowly, which helps ease the withdrawal symptoms. However, withdrawal can still result in a range of unpleasant physical and psychological side effects. Some of the common physical symptoms include:

Some psychological symptoms include:

Rebound Symptoms

Because Xanax is prescribed to treat anxiety, panic disorders, and insomnia, quitting the drug can result in these symptoms returning with intensity. These are known as rebound symptoms. Although they usually decrease in severity after one week, it is important to seek support from mental health services and addiction specialists to solve the underlying cause of drug addiction.

What Next?

Substance abuse treatment is a long-term endeavor, and detoxing is just the first step. Once detox has been completed, those in recovery are advised to continue with different treatment options to ensure they maintain sobriety.

Addiction treatment options include attending support groups such as a 12-step program, seeing a mental health professional, and building a support system. Implementing healthy coping strategies will also help those in recovery stay on the right path and adopt a positive routine.

Those in need will be advised to enroll either in an inpatient or outpatient rehab program for treatment. The program best suited to them will depend on their recovery needs, the severity of addiction, and how long they have struggled with addiction.

While many people overlook it, psychological support is vital during recovery. Getting to the root of the problem by addressing underlying mental health issues will help decrease the risk of relapse.

To Conclude

If a loved one is struggling with Xanax abuse or addiction, the good news is that there is help available. Addiction is a disease that causes many to experience feelings of shame and isolation, so remember to be kind to anyone who may be struggling.

With the right care, advice, and support, Xanax addiction can be overcome, and a life free from substance abuse can be achieved.

Do I Need a Medical Detox from Cocaine?

Too many people are suffering without adequate treatment for cocaine addiction. According to SAMHSA, in 2016, only 163,979 people checked into rehab for cocaine addiction treatment, very few of whom listed it as a primary reason. By comparison, it is estimated that out of 1.9 million American users, 867,000 men and women were suffering from treatable cocaine use disorders that year. 

This gap is partly rooted in misunderstandings about the nature of cocaine addiction. Many people hear that medical detox and treatment isn’t necessary unless you’re experiencing physical dependence - leading cocaine users to attempt dangerous withdrawals at home. Today we’ll talk about why medical detox is a safer and more effective choice for cocaine withdrawal. 

What is Medical Detox?

Medical detoxification (or detox) is the crucial first step in treating substance dependence and misuse disorders. It refers to the rehab facility’s provision of a safe environment where clients undergo medically-supported withdrawal in the care and careful monitoring of both physicians and psychiatric staff. When necessary, clients may receive medication to relieve withdrawal symptoms. Medical detox places the client’s safety and comfort as the first priority and ensures they are being supported through this uncomfortable process at all times.

Cocaine Withdrawal Syndrome: What to Expect

Withdrawal is hard (and dangerous) alone. Long-term binging of cocaine affects the way the brain synthesizes and responds to dopamine. Once an addicted user decides to quit and flush the drug out of their system, it leaves behind a profound chemical imbalance in the brain that takes time to heal. This imbalance causes an uncomfortable state of withdrawal, characterized by:

These symptoms are not easy to manage without support. The standard timeline for cocaine withdrawal is divided into two stages: first, the initial crash, which sets in just hours after your last dose and can last for days as dopamine depletion sets in. After that, there is an extended withdrawal period which can last for weeks, of persistent emotional lows combined with strong cravings for another high. When withdrawing without help at home and surrounded by triggers, these symptoms frequently push users in recovery to relapse. 

A Note On Psychological Addiction

Let’s clarify a few things before we continue. Cocaine addiction tends to be characterized as psychological dependence. People who compulsively abuse cocaine are more likely to have lost control of their use due to a combination of emotional and behavioral rewards rather than physiological changes

This distinction is problematic when it leads people to believe that psychological dependence is less real or less demanding of treatment than physical dependence. Keep in mind that the opposite is often true. Uncovering triggers and healing the mind from addictive thinking is the crux of most SUD treatment - a longer and more complex side of the process than treating physiological symptoms of physiological dependence. 

At the same time, the emotional symptoms experienced during withdrawal should not be underestimated. Cocaine overdose is common, and as soon as you enter withdrawal, your tolerance begins to plummet - greatly increasing the risk of a life-threatening event if you relapse. Take these symptoms seriously.

Detoxing Safely from Cocaine: The Process

During your detox, you stay in the care of the medical team at your drug rehab facility for the duration of your withdrawal. You can expect a restorative, sometimes luxurious medical environment free of substances, triggers, and stressors from the outside world. 

The different therapies available will vary depending on your health history and your treatment program of choice. Still, your team will focus on keeping your experience relaxed and comfortable. Presently, the FDA hasn’t approved any medications to support detoxing from cocaine, but treatment centers generally have psychiatric teams on-call. They are there to help treat withdrawal symptoms through therapeutic approaches or medication when needed. 

Medical detox is particularly necessary for individuals that suffer from any comorbid conditions that often accompany cocaine addiction. The dopamine imbalance experienced by a user who normally suffers from depression or anxiety is even greater and more difficult to cope with. Treatment facilities that offer dual diagnosis will also assess clients for common co-occurring disorders, allowing them to:

To conclude, if you’re considering quitting cocaine use for good and are willing to engage in support during the detox period, you’re setting yourself up to thrive in recovery. Medical detox is worth it - both for your safety and your success. 

The Worrying Correlation Between Opioid Dependency and Early Life Adversity

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, misuse and addiction to opioid drugs is a serious national crisis in the United States. Every year, opioid misuse costs the country $78.5 billion, and in 2019 over 50,000 people died from an opioid overdose.

To help tackle this crisis, extensive scientific research has tried to uncover some of the reasons behind opioid dependence and abuse. Recent studies have suggested that early life adversity - stressful childhood experiences - could be an important risk factor for developing an opioid addiction.

What Is Early Life Adversity?

Early life adversity is the experience of distressing or traumatic events in a person’s childhood. Adverse childhood experiences may include physical or sexual abuse, exposure to violence, neglect, lack of affection, or witnessing a parent’s alcohol or drug addiction.

Early childhood adversity can affect brain development and have a major impact on a person’s later life and mental and physical health. It can start destructive thought and behavioral patterns that can be carried through to adulthood, affect the ability to form healthy relationships and cause low self-esteem, distrust, and aggression. 

Early life adversity increases your risk of developing many kinds of mental health issues, including depression, anxiety, panic attacks, alcoholism, and other substance use disorders.

What Is the Link Between Opioid Dependency and Early Life Adversity?

Recent studies have uncovered a worrying correlation between opioid dependence and early life adversity. They have found that individuals with a history of child abuse and adversity are disproportionally prone to opioid addiction. 

Advanced and sophisticated research is currently taking place into exactly how this relationship works. A Molecular Psychiatry study found that, in rats, stressful early life events may lead to increased relapse-like behavior and major increases in opioid demand. They may also increase the desire for treats, leading people to seek highly pleasurable experiences like opioid highs.

Another study found that early life adversity like child abuse, neglect, and low socioeconomic status can affect your stress response system by diminishing your cortisol response to stress. Cortisol is a hormone that your body naturally releases in stressful situations that helps you respond to and recover from these events in a healthy way. Diminished cortisol responses can have a range of effects, including alcohol abuse and experimentation with drugs, and may help explain the link between early life adversity and opioid dependency.

A third study found that childhood adversity could have an impact on the reward system in the brain. Disruption to the reward system is an underlying feature of most addictions and can contribute to the development of opioid addiction. It causes the brain to compulsively seek a substance in pursuit of a reward, even when it is harmful to your health and well-being. 

Treatment and Prevention

The effects of early life adversity can be extremely damaging in the long term, leading to opioid dependencies and psychological disorders. However, adults, children, and families can seek treatment to safely manage the feelings connected with traumatic early life experiences and prevent them from causing further problems later in life.

Effective, evidence-based programs are available to treat opioid dependence and addiction. Rehabilitation centers offer various therapies, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, talking therapies, and other treatment approaches to support people through the recovery process and help them maintain abstinence.

Most programs offer dual diagnosis treatment plans where early childhood adversity can be treated alongside addiction for people who have also suffered from childhood trauma. Treating co-occurring disorders as part of an addiction treatment program helps substance users overcome the underlying causes of addiction, so they do not slip back into old habits at the end of the treatment program. 

This approach facilitates holistic healing of the entire person and supports them on the road to a happy and productive sober life.

 

 

 

What is the most addictive substance?

Humans use a variety of substances for a wide range of reasons. While many substances are used for medical purposes, people can misuse them to achieve a desired effect, and people can obtain substances illicitly to reach a high.

Whether obtained through a prescription or illicit, it’s always important to understand the risks associated with substance abuse. Take a look below at some of the most addictive substances and how they can affect you.

Nicotine

Nicotine is the highly addictive substance most commonly found in tobacco e-cigarette and cigarette products. It is the most common addiction in America. Besides the damage to the lungs associated with smoking, nicotine itself can be dangerous because it increases your heart rate, putting you at risk for heart disease.

Barbiturates

Barbiturates, also known as downers, are substances that are usually prescribed to treat anxiety and help people sleep. However, they may also be obtained illicitly by anyone who wants to misuse them for their euphoric effects.

Misusing barbiturates is extremely risky because they can suppress the breathing rate to a point at which the user may asphyxiate.

Cocaine

Cocaine is an entirely illicit substance, yet millions of people are able to obtain it and use it to reach a high. It works by causing a surge in your dopamine levels, which induces an extremely euphoric state. However, when this effect wears off, the brain desires more, which leads to an increasing consumption of cocaine as you seek to achieve the desired effect.

Using cocaine is risky because it causes your heart rate to increase. Overdose can occur if the heart rate elevates too much.

Alcohol

Alcohol consumption is extremely common in America. While some people may be able to enjoy an occasional drink responsibly, many misuse alcohol and form a dependency on it. Like many other substances, alcohol works by increasing dopamine levels in the brain.

Your body can easily build a tolerance to alcohol, which means you will require more to achieve the desired effect. Over time, alcohol consumption can physically alter your brain, leading to a dependency. It can be dangerous to try to quit on your own at this point because you need medical supervision to help reduce any health risks associated with withdrawal.

Heroin

Heroin takes the number one spot on addiction because of how quickly a user can become addicted. One in 4 people who try heroin end up becoming addicted after the first time. What’s worse is that heroin use is extremely dangerous and has a high risk of death from overdose and relapse. If you have tried heroin and suspect you are addicted, please don’t hesitate to seek treatment assistance from professionals.

Start your recovery journey at Tulip Hill Recovery

At Tulip Hill Recovery, we focus on discovering what factors in your life may be contributing to addiction in order to treat it at its main source. Our treatment model emphasizes the dual diagnosis approach, which means we treat addiction as well as co-occurring mental health disorders that might be fueling the addiction. This helps a person in recovery become better equipped for dealing with the challenges of mental health disorders without feeling like they need substances or alcohol to cope.

Are you ready to talk to someone about treatment for addiction for you or someone you love? Please contact us online or call us at 877-845-8192 to get in touch with our team and help start the recovery journey.

Three ways to support someone in the early stages of addiction recovery

When someone is in the early stages of addiction recovery, they need all the support they can get. Your support might be just what they need to stay on track with their recovery and enjoy a life free from addiction. However, supporting someone in the early stages of addiction recovery can feel challenging. To help, our team wants to provide some tips that you can use as you support someone in recovery.

Supporting someone in the early stages of addiction recovery

  1. Listen — Treatment is just the beginning of addiction recovery. Recovery can be looked at as a lifelong process of maintaining sobriety and resisting temptation. These early stages of recovery can be physically and mentally challenging, and it’s important that your loved one has someone who is willing to listen to them and support them.
  2. Be patient — Sobriety doesn’t happen overnight. It is a process that requires time and effort. It’s important to be patient and be a source of positivity that can help encourage your loved one to continue on their recovery journey.
  3. Host sober activities — One of the struggles people recovering from addiction face is simply enjoying their time without substances or alcohol. Without what was once the center of their attention, they might feel lost. You can help them rediscover how to enjoy their time by hosting sober activities, such as going to grab a cup of coffee, spending a day in the park, watching a movie, hosting a board game night and many more similar activities.

Start the recovery journey at Tulip Hill Recovery

Is someone you love struggling with an alcohol or substance addiction? Clinical and therapy professionals, like those at Tulip Hill Recovery, can provide addiction treatment and counseling. However, people like you who are involved in the recovering person’s day-to-day life can also play a role by being supportive throughout their recovery journey.

Do you need to talk with someone about seeking professional treatment for an addiction? At Tulip Hill, our treatment model emphasizes the dual diagnosis approach, which means we treat addiction as well as co-occurring mental health disorders that might be fueling the addiction. This helps a person in recovery become better equipped for dealing with the challenges of mental health disorders without feeling like they need substances or alcohol to cope. Please contact us online or call us at 877-845-8192 to get in touch with our team and help start the recovery journey.

How substance addiction can drive you into debt

A substance addiction has far-reaching effects that extend beyond that of your health. It can affect your relationships, your education, your job and your financial security. It’s difficult to weigh the severity of these impacts when you are struggling with an addiction. However, you should try to take a step back and view the big picture of things to see how addiction truly affects you or someone you love.

The costs of substance addiction

Substances alone can be expensive to purchase. Whether purchasing under a prescription or illegally r, each time you purchase a substance you are taking a significant chunk out of your finances. 

And it doesn’t stop there.

Misusing prescription drugs can lead to an increase in health insurance premiums. Additionally, you may need to pay for legal fees if you are charged with a DUI or other crimes that may be associated with substance abuse.

Another cost of substance addiction is in your work itself. Addiction to substances can put your job at risk by limiting your ability to perform your duties effectively and safely or by causing you to miss out on shifts entirely. 

Start the recovery journey at Tulip Hill Recovery

Facing down financial ruin is a very real possibility when substance use takes over your life. It’s important to get a hold of the situation as soon as possible for the benefit of your physical health, mental health and financial well-being.

At Tulip Hill Recovery, our clinical and therapy professionals can help give you the tools to live a happy and productive life without relying on drugs or alcohol. . Our treatment model emphasizes the dual diagnosis approach, which means we treat addiction as well as co-occurring mental health disorders that might be fueling the addiction. This helps a person in recovery become better equipped for dealing with the challenges of mental health disorders without feeling like they need substances or alcohol to cope.

Are you ready to talk to someone about treatment for addiction for you or someone you love? Please contact us online or call us at 877-845-8192 to get in touch with our team and help start the recovery journey.

Understanding the real risks of mixing drugs and alcohol

An addiction to substances alone is already challenging enough for someone to go through. However, if you mix the use of substances and alcohol at the same time, you severely increase your risk of harming your health. 

It is imperative that you never mix drugs and alcohol. When mixed with alcohol, certain substances like opioids can cause drastic effects. If you are struggling with an addiction, it’s important to seek treatment from professionals to help lower your health risks of overdose and other complications. 

The very real danger of mixing drugs and alcohol

Many people are tuned out to the dangers of mixing drugs and alcohol because they have grown deaf to the constant lessons and warnings you hear growing up. However, there is a very real danger involved with mixing drugs and alcohol that we all need to take seriously.

Opioid substances, such as oxycodone or hydrocodone, act as central nervous system depressants. Alcohol also acts as a central nervous system depressant. Mixing the two together can magnify their effects and lead to serious complications, including:

Respiratory depression is one of the most dangerous side effects associated with mixing drugs and alcohol. It is usually what causes the other serious complications. As the breathing slows or stops, the brain and other organs starve for oxygen, which can cause them to start shutting down. 

Learn the signs of an overdose

If you suspect someone you care about is using substances and mixing them with alcohol, it is important to try to help them seek treatment and to know the symptoms of an overdose. It is possible to reverse the effects of an overdose if you are able to act quickly.

The signs of an overdose on drugs and alcohol may include:

Start the recovery journey at Tulip Hill Recovery

Do you or someone you know struggle with alcohol or substance addiction? Overcoming an addiction on your own can be quite an uphill battle, but with professional help, freedom from addiction is possible. 

At Tulip Hill Recovery, our treatment model emphasizes the dual diagnosis approach, which means we treat addiction as well as co-occurring mental health disorders that might be fueling the addiction. This helps a person in recovery become better equipped for dealing with the challenges of mental health disorders without feeling like they need substances or alcohol to cope.

Are you ready to talk to someone about treatment for addiction for you or someone you love? Please contact us online or call us at 877-845-8192 to get in touch with our team and help start the recovery journey.

Does the Family and Medical Leave Act cover addiction rehab?

Recognizing the struggle with substance or alcohol addiction is only part of people’s concerns with addiction. Another pressing concern that weighs on many minds who are trying to decide whether to seek treatment is whether they will lose their jobs. 

Finding work can be hard in this competitive economy, and it can be daunting to consider leaving work to take time for the treatment you need. However, thanks to the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), you shouldn’t need to make a choice between treatment or your job.

What is the Family and Medical Leave Act?

FMLA is a law that was enacted in 1993 to provide protection for eligible employees of covered employers who need time off work for family emergencies and medical purposes. If provides up to 12 weeks worth of unpaid, protected leave per 12-month period. This means that while you might not earn pay during your time away from work for a medical reason, your job status is still protected and you will still work after you have recovered.

If you are struggling with addiction and need professional treatment, you may be eligible to to qualify for FMLA regulated medical leave if:

If you are unsure if you are eligible for FMLA coverage, talk to your human resources department. They can help you determine your coverage status and coordinate your time off while you seek treatment. 

Start the recovery journey at Tulip Hill Recovery

Whether or not you qualify for FMLA coverage, if you are struggling with addiction, you need to seek help. At Tulip Hill Recovery, we will work to make sure you find the right treatment you need, whether it is with us or with a better-suited program for your needs.

If you are a good candidate for treatment with us, we will focus on discovering what factors in your life may be contributing to addiction in order to treat it at its main source. Our treatment model emphasizes the dual diagnosis approach, which means we treat addiction as well as co-occurring mental health disorders that might be fueling the addiction. This helps a person in recovery become better equipped for dealing with the challenges of mental health disorders without feeling like they need substances or alcohol to cope.

Are you ready to talk to someone about treatment for addiction for you or someone you love? Please contact us online or call us at 877-845-8192 to get in touch with our team and help start the recovery journey.